CALIBUS

The first and only CMOS-based LIBS analyser measuring carbon in ferrous.

The CALIBUS is the latest in a series of laser-induced breakdown spectrometers (LIBS) from ARUN Technology. It is an ideal analytical solution for QA/QC, metallurgical manufacturing and machining, the petrochemical industries, mining, scrap metal and recycling.

  • The CALIBUS is the latest in a series of laser-induced breakdown spectrometers (LIBS) from ARUN Technology. It is the first and only CMOS-based LIBS analyser in the market to measure carbon in ferrous. The new CALIBUS is an ideal analytical solution for QA/QC, metallurgical manufacturing and machining, petrochemical industries, mining, scrp metal and recycling.

  • Number of Models3
    Laser SourcePulse laser, Laser pulse 50Hz, Laser wavelength 1064nm
    Wavelength Range190-800nm
    Number of Optical Cells3
    SensorCMOS
    Operating Temperature0°C to +40°C
    Operating Humidity20% - 95%
    WeightApproximately 2kg
    Dimensions92mm x 295mm x 245mm
    Operating SystemAndroid
    Argon SystemFlush
    Analysis Time1 second
    Anti-CombustionPositive pressure combustion-proof
    Certification/ComplianceIP56
    Display Screen5" colour touch screen
    IECIEC61000-4-2, IEC61000-4-3, IEC61000-4-4, IEC610004-5, IEC61000-4-11
    Element Analysis CapababilitiesC, Si, Mn, Cr, Ni, Mo, Cu, V, Ti, Al, Be, B, Li, Na, Pb, Sn, Fe, Cu, Mg, Zn, Co and more!
    BatteryA single battery operates 6-10 hours depending on the environmental temperature. Two rechargeable lithium batteries are included. 
  • Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a type of optical emission spectroscopy used to measure elemental concentrations in a material. In LIBS, a laser pulse strikes the surface of the sample and ablates an amount of material in the range of 1 ng and generates a plasma plume (partially ionized gas) in the temperature range of 4,700- 19,700°C. The energy of the laser is low but is focused to a microscopic point on the sample to generate the plasma. In this plasma, the matter constituting the samples is dissociated into atoms (atomization) and partially ionized. Those atoms and ions will be excited (transition of electrons from lower to higher energy levels of valence shell) and by returning into their ground state (transition from higher to lower level of valence shell) they will emit characteristic lines for each element. The emitted light is transmitted through optical fibres and the polychromatic radiation is dispersed in one or more spectrometers by diffraction gratings and detected by CCD (or CMOS) chips. The spectra of LIBS can contain hundreds or even thousands of lines for a single element. The sensitivity of those lines can differ by several orders of magnitude and result in extremely line rich spectra, especially when the sample contains high concentrations of transition metals as it is the case for alloys like stainless steel. In typical LIBS systems, the dispersion power of the spectrometer is often limited by its size and some important analytical lines may not be fully resolved from lines emitted by the matrix. To cover the entire spectral range between 180 and 800 nm, multiple spectrometers may be required. Moreover, wavelengths of less than 200 nm (like C 193.09 nm or S 180.73 nm) are strongly absorbed by air and require an argon purge of the optical path to be detected. Almost any element generally contained in metals can be detected with LIBS: 3 Principles of LIBS Authored by Anna Richardson June 2020 the sensitivity for alkaline (Li, Na, etc.) and alkaline-earth metals (Be, Mg, etc.) is very high and the sensitivity for transition metals is good, except for refractory elements like Nb, Mo, W, or Ta which are difficult to determine. The sensitivity for P and S is generally not sufficient to analyse those elements at relevant levels in alloys. Carbon can be detected in carbon steel and cast iron.

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